Congress 2013

The fourth Congress of EUGEO, the association of European geographical societies.

 

The next EUGEO Congress will be held in Rome in early September, 2013. To be kept up to date with the latest information, please visitwww.eugeo2013.com and register to receive updates via email.

 

Suggested activities in London

Delegates may be interested in the following activities, suggested by staff of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), while they are visiting London:

 

Real Food Market at Convent Garden
Located in Covent Garden and is open every Thursday from April 2011. The market is celebrated as one of central London’s finest food markets. You will find everything from loose tea leaves to speciality cupcakes; spiced salami to the freshest bread and pastries! Check out the Real Food Market at Covent Garden if you are in pursuit of gastronomic bliss!
http://www.coventgardenlondonuk.com/events-entertainment-culture/articles/the-return-of-the-real-food-market

Australian Landscape at the British Museum
Experience an authentic Australian landscape in the in the Heart of London at the British Museum with free entry until 16th October 2011.. Discover unique and highly endangered plant species here harvested from across the diverse Australian landscape.
http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/australian_season/australia_landscape.aspx

Tours of the Olympics 2012 venues and sites
 
As London countdown to the 2012 Olympics, be part of the magic and experience the Olympic site village through a walking tour, and See the Olympic Park taking shape before your eyes.
 
 
 
 
 
Summer at Kew Gardens
 
The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew famed for their contribution to botanical understanding and species development. Travel the World this Summer with Kew Gardens and experience plant life from all corners of the world!
 
 
 
 
Notting Hill Carnival
 
28 August 2011 – 29 August 2011. The Nottinghill Carnival is the largest festival celebration of its kind in Europe, and has been held every August Bank Holiday since 1966. Each year the streets of Nottinghill come alive with the vibrant sounds and smells of Europe’s biggest street festival. Come and experience vibrant colourful costumes, traditional Caribbean music and exotic footstalls.
 
 
 
 
 

Brick Lane Market in Spitalfields
 
An authentic East End London experience; with Jewish bagel shops, Bangladeshi curry houses, Indian sari silks. This chaotic and bustling marker attracts lots of young Londoners, in search of second-hand furniture, unusual clothes and bits of this-and-that
 
 
 
 
Chiswick House and Grounds
 
Chiswick House is among the most glorious examples of 18th century British architecture and makes a fascinating day out in West London.
 
 
 
 
London Walks – Discovery Walks
 
An ideal way to experience and discover one of the world’s greatest cities. You can leave behind the busy main roads and the well-frequented tourist haunts and discover the backstreets and hidden places where the history of this wonderful City was forged. Popular walks include, Jack the Ripper Tour, or for the really brave, London Ghost Walks.
 
 
 
 
River boat trips with the Thames Clipper
 
Just over half an hour to Greenwich from Embankment or London Eye, or go on to Woolwich to travel through the Thames barrier (and where you can visit both the Greenwich Heritage Centre and Firepower artillery museum). The Thames Clipper service is fast and frequent; and a perfect way to admire London’s finest landmarks, with on-board refreshments available.
 
 
 
 
 
 
A Beatles Magical Mystery Tour of London
 
Operated by London Walks, the Beatles Magical Mystery Tour is a unique opportunity to imagine The Beatles and the swinging 60s in London, by visiting some of the Beatles favourite haunts.
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Museum of London Docklands
 
Uncover London’s long history as a port through stories of trade, migration and commerce. The Museum of London Docklands displays the Port and River collection and explores the story of London’s river, port and people from Roman settlement, through to the recent regeneration of Docklands.
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Geffrye Museum
 
The Geffrye Museum in Shoreditch which shows the changing style of the English domestic interior in a series of period rooms from 1600 to the present day; the museum depicts the quintessential style of English middle-class living rooms.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Woodlands Restaurant
 
Try some authentic South Indian food in London’s Piccadilly. Woodlands serve the finest, most authentic Indian vegetarian food in London in their restaurant located in the heart of London.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Liberty London – The Department Store
 
Today Liberty is the leading destination store in London, a wonderful emporium where the latest fashions sit alongside design classics. The Liberty is a great place for shopping, or to simply admire the buildings impressive and the beautiful interior and architecture!
 
 
 
 
 
 

Highgate Cemetery
 
Karl Marx and a host of other celebrities from years gone by are buried here. It’s a fascinating place, full of history and ancient relics, and a guided tour is recommended.
 
 
 
 
 
 

London’s Southbank
 
Take a walk on the Southbank from the London Eye east-wards towards Tate Modern and the Globe Theatre. The Southbank is always lively with an excellent view of the river and the iconic London sky-line, and plenty of cultural and gourmet distractions en-route. This Summer celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the Festival of Britain; with music, art work and exhibitions lining the Southbank.
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Saatchi in Sloane Square
 
The Saatchi Gallery aims to provide an innovative forum for contemporary art, presenting work by largely unseen young artists or by international artists whose work has been rarely or never exhibited in the UK. The gallery is full of some spectacular and exciting work from some new and up-and-coming artists.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Buckingham Palace
 
23 July 2011 – 3 October 2011. Get an exclusive chance to see the Duchess of Cambridge’s wedding dress on display in the Buckingham Palace State Rooms. Kate Middleton wore chose British designed Alexander McQueen for her dress, and the gown will go on display alongside the shoes, earrings and tiara worn by the Duchess on the 29 April 2011.
 
 
 
 
 
 
The BBC Proms
 
The BBC Proms is an eight-week summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts and other events held annually, predominantly in the Royal Albert Hall.
 
15 July 2011 – 10 September 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
A Cockroach Tour of the Science Museum
 
A day in the life of a cockroach!! Find out what it’s like to be one of the planet’s true survivors. Get an education like never before – a fresh approach on the nature of the human race, all from the point of view of a cockroach.
 
 
 
 
London Street Photography at the Museum of London
 
Open until 4 September 2011, free entry. Showcase of an extraordinary collection of London street photography; with over 200 candid images of everyday life on the streets of London. Travel through time and explore how street photography has evolved from 1860 to present day, from sepia horse-drawn carriage scenes to 21st century Londoners clutching at their Starbucks!
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hand-drawn London at the Museum of London
 
Open until 11 September 2011, free entry. Hand-drawn mapping is not factual, nor utilised as a Geographical tool; but it is based upon the individual experiences, perceptions and imaginations of Londoners. The maps have been created by the public’s personal projections of their relationship with London’s landscape.
 
 

 

Congress 2007

EUGEO 2007 – Amsterdam

The first congress of EUGEO, the association of European geographical societies

Dates: August 19-23 2007
Location: Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam

Europe’s Geographical Challenges: Science Meets Policy

FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON THE GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE

EUGEO 2007 was the first major conference to be organized by the European Association of Geographical Societies. It was open to everyone involved in geography in Europe and the geography of Europe.

Invited were all who are engaged in a geographical field – be it in policy, planning, human geography, physical geography, geomorphology, GIS and cartography, geographical education, or any other related area – and who share our common interest: European landscapes, peoples, places, and environments.

The conference was hosted jointly by the Royal Dutch Geographical Society and the University of Amsterdam.

The organizers sought to bring together scholars and policy-makers from all European countries and from a wide range of geographical disciplines and application fields. The aim of the conference was to generate new geographical views on Europe’s major problems and present them in a format that is relevant to society, policy, and business.

CONFERENCE PROFILE: Europe’s Geographical Challenges

The ‘Old World’ is struggling to respond to challenges arising from within Europe and imposed from the outside.  It needs to move European integration forward; to that end, Europe has to design and implement governance arrangements that are both acceptable and workable. At the same time, Europe must generate a realistic vision for its future position in a globalizing world. Meanwhile, Europe is trying to provide its citizens and businesses with political and socio-economic perspectives, which include preserving the valuable elements of its rich cultural and natural heritage.

Europe’s changing geography is at the core of these ongoing and impending transitions. Thus, geographical researchers need to communicate with persons working on geo-relevant policy and management tasks so they can jointly tackle the tough issues at hand. This conference provides a forum to do just that by providing a format for effective exchange of ideas and an inspiring environment for debate.

THE MAIN THEMES OF THE CONFERENCE

‘Standort Europa’ at Risk

Economic growth in the Member States depends increasingly on their ability to remain attractive places for firms to locate and operate. The challenge is to strengthen their appeal to a global business community. The first step is to analyse the perspectives for Europe’s comparative advantages over time and in space. Does the key to success lie in a full-fledged knowledge and information economy? Does Europe offer the highly skilled labour pool and the flexible labour market that global business requires? Is Europe still ‘the place to be’ for cultural tourism? Can it become a core area for leisure and retirement? Would modernizing the transportation infrastructure reinforce the competitive position of the European economy? How will trends in labour migration develop? ‘Standort Europa’ calls for a geographical interpretation of the Lisbon Agenda.

Towards Revitalized and Cohesive Cities

Europe has the richest and most extensive urban culture in the world. The urban scene is still dominated by historic cities that have responded to the new economic and transport realities. But massive migration flows, increasing social inequality, urban sprawl, deteriorating city districts, and traffic congestion are seriously undermining confidence in European models of social and urban development. Does the global cities model work in Europe? If not, do we need to conceive of Europe’s regional metropolises in new ways? There are complex social, economic, and governance problems that have to be addressed. But there are also many examples of successful city reconstruction and regeneration projects. The European approach to making cities balanced, liveable, and viable needs to be thoroughly analysed. The model should be re-engineered with respect to its form and function but also with a view to city planning and management.

The Changing Face of Rural Europe

Europe’s countryside is dynamic; changes in activities and functions are affecting European land use and landscapes. The different look of the countryside is giving rural Europe a new lease on life by generating new sources of livelihood. Change is certain, but its direction is not. The question is how to deal with this complex transition. Both the nature and the intensity of the transformation of Europe’s open space will vary widely across the continent. Where, how and at what rate will agriculture either continue to ‘industrialise’ and visibly disappear from the countryside or, alternatively, further explore the potential and sustainability of, for example, small scale organic farming and diversification of functions? Will Nature be cut back, be preserved, or be restored and developed? What about the residential function in rural Europe? Will it be limited to an increase of second homes, or will the countryside undergo further suburbanization? To what extent will rural areas host leisure, recreation, and tourism activities? The changing face of rural Europe will also affect developments in urbanized areas and the prospects for regional planning.

Genuine European: Culture, Identity, and Diversity

Europe is a conglomerate of countries. But Europe is also a compendium of ideas, traditions, institutions, and identities. It is not entirely clear what Europe is. What we do know is that cultural diversity is at the heart of the continent and requires European approaches to geographical issues. Much of this cultural diversity is a legacy – the contemporary use of Europe’s rich and diverse past. But whose legacy will be preserved or deemed worthy of preservation? What about the contribution of non-European immigrants to the European heritage? These questions pertain to the role of territorial identities, which are grounded in the bonds between people and places. An exploration of continuity and change in the territorial identities of Europe is highly topical, and so is an inquiry into how these identities affect regional-economic and urban development. The outcomes of such an inquiry should be translated into practical policy. Some of the gaps in knowledge are highly topical as well, as the following questions suggest: How does secularization and the rise of religious pluralism change the ‘territorial identity’ map of Europe? Will there be a European Islam? How does Europe deal with minority and gender issues? Does attention to the geography of Europe imply a need for a European approach in geography?

Nature Strikes Back

The (over-) exploitation of Europe’s natural environment puts geography at the forefront of policy debates. The aim of the conference organizers is to stimulate discussion on the deterioration of the European environment. The aim of researchers should be to offer recommendations on the prevention of natural and environmental hazards, immediately and in the long run. Global change has to be looked at from a European perspective. Water management will be a major issue: the effects of rising sea levels, intermittently increasing water volumes in rivers and lakes, and the growing threat of flooding and erosion. But drought and the accompanying wildfires also pose a threat to Europe’s environment.

At the heart of the relationship between Man and Nature lies the interaction between demographic and economic development, on the one side, and the carrying capacity of the natural environment, on the other. Can Europe continue to cope with our ecological footprint in future? As human occupancy in environmentally vulnerable areas increases, so does the risk of damage and disaster. The challenge highlighted by the ‘Nature Strikes Back’ theme is addressed to researchers. They are called upon to analyse causes and effects and are expected to come up with recommendations for sustainable growth under the severe pressure of economic production and consumption patterns.

Balanced Multilevel Governance

The intricate political texture of Europe’s geospace raises penetrating questions among geographers and planners. Meanwhile, global geopolitical developments affect Europe’s position in the world. This interplay concentrates the minds of geographers and planners on continuity and change in the external relations of Europe, specifically with North America, East and South Asia, and Europe’s former colonies. Looking outward, the field is confronted with questions of hegemony and multipolarity in the world. Looking inward, policy-makers have to respond to a very serious challenge, namely that of designing and implementing acceptable, effective and sustainable forms of multilevel governance. Subsidiarity as well as internal and external border effects have to be redefined at all tiers levels of government. All territorial relationships need to be reconsidered: villages and urban districts versus municipalities; regions versus nation-states; and countries versus the European Union. Another challenge is how to chart the flows of capital and investment in relation to territorial systems. Moreover, as government evolves towards governance, it becomes imperative to chart the position of the numerous stakeholders. All in all, there is a need to find a new role for public policy in an era of privatization and decentralization.

Find published presentations: http://scholar.google.nl/scholar?hl=nl&q=eugeo+2007&btnG=&lr=

 
Read MoreSpeakers at EUGEO 2007:
Congress Chair Joost Terwindt, EUGEO President Christian Vandermotten; ESPON Director Peter Mehlbye.

EUGEO 2007 in the University of Amsterdam

Delegates in the streets of  Amsterdam

Manifesto, compiled after EUGEO 2007

The Contribution of Geography towards the Future of Europe

Sako Musterd and Joost Terwindt (reporters)

EUGEO 2007 was the inaugural meeting of geographers and associated professionals from
all over Europe. They joined in preparing a credible vision of
an economically viable, socially cohesive, and ecologically robust Europe, and how to get there. EUGEO was organized by the European Association of Geographical Societies, and hosted by the Royal Dutch Geographical Society and the University of Amsterdam.

This Manifesto is the product of three days of research presentations and detailed discussions by
the participants and other correspondents. It is aimed at policy makers and planners throughout Europe, and senior officials in the EU Commission.
It is also directed to geographers everywhere, and to fellow professionals and civil activists
in all walks of life throughout
the world.

EUGEO selected six key themes regarding the environmental, economic and social well being of a changing Europe, as its point of departure.

These are:

1. Standort Europa. A vision of effective and cohesive competitive European economies.

2. Revitalizing the city. A vision of economically, socially and culturally diverse cities that bring together many groups enjoying pleasurable livelihoods.

3. Diversifying rural societies and economies. A vision of rural futures that are agriculturally and economically viable, diverse and providing opportunities for new livelihoods.

4. Friendship with nature. A vision of a way of living that recognizes the costs and dangers to society of undermining the ecosystem processes which maintain life on this planet, and preparing and adapting to a world where nature is treated as a friend and not an enemy.

5. Acknowledging Europe’s diversity. Here we talk about a vision of a Europe that enjoys its heritage, its cultural diversity, its regional, and local distinctiveness, and its scope for local differentiation for promoting various versions of sustainable living.

6. Multi-level governance. A vision that shares the task of governing at all levels, that recognizes the relationships in multi-national governing, and sub-national governance for viable livelihoods.

This Manifesto will summarize the findings of the research discussions on these topics and chart a way forward for the next EUGEO conference and beyond.

Competitiveness: economy and culture

Under the label ‘Standort Europa’ at Risk, this conference – in the wake of the Lisbon Agenda that addressed the objective to strengthen Europe’s global competitiveness as a knowledge-based economy – discussed the economic position of Europe in a globalising world. Europe still has a strong position in the world economy, but there is a continuous challenge to strengthen its appeal to the global business community and to remain an attractive place for people and firms to locate and operate. This conference picked up that challenge and addressed the specific perspectives for Europe’s comparative advantages over time

and in space. It was argued that not all cities are able to opt for similar creative, knowledge and information economy strategies. Different conditions for economic development were addressed, including the technical and knowledge infrastructure, relations between places, other hard and soft conditions and spatial clustering.

The question for Europe typically is: “what are the specific characteristics that give European cities and countries a comparative advantage over other places in the world?” The answer is

– of course – hard to give, but likely, more than branding and place marketing are required. In economic geography theories referring to hard conditions, cluster theories and theories focusing
on soft conditions have been put forward. With regard to the hard conditions (infrastructure, universities, available labour, tax regimes, etc.) it is difficult
to find a comparative advantage that
is not also claimed by other regions.

New Multilevel Governance

The intricate political texture of Europe’s geospace raises penetrating questions among geographers and planners. Meanwhile, global geopolitical developments affect Europe’s position
in the world. This interplay concentrates the minds of geographers and planners on continuity and change in the external relations of Europe, specifically with North America, East and South Asia,
and Europe’s former colonies. Looking outward, the field is at the global scale confronted with questions of hegemony and multipolarity. Certainly towards the East, Europe lacks a clear-cut delimitation. The recent dynamism of European political cooperation has not yet resulted in a stable political configuration. Looking inward, policy-makers have to respond to a very serious challenge, namely that of designing and implementing acceptable, effective and sustainable forms of multilevel governance. The principle

of subsidiarity has to be translated in practical terms and to be implemented. Border effects have constantly to be re-assessed at all tiers of government. All territorial relationships are subject

to dynamic changes and need to be reconsidered: villages and urban places and the administrative systems with
their municipalities, communes and metro-governments; regions versus nation-states; and countries versus the European Union. Another challenge is how to chart and affect the flows of capital and investment in relation to territorial systems. Moreover, as government evolves towards governance, it becomes imperative to chart the position of the numerous stakeholders and to consider the questions regarding the meaning of democracy. All in all, there is a need to find a new form of polity in Europe. The current difficulties in the European system of governance are to an extent the result of its ever increasing complexities. Geographers and planners have always been interested in the territorial orders in which public policy has to function. It is time that they contribute to the drawing of new roles for public policy in an emerging polity showing a higher degree of privatization and decentralization than used to be the case.

However, there are major differences between Europe and the rest of the world, and these differences may be
the assets for competitive economic development in the longer run. This conference related the economic competition with issues on social and cultural diversity, richness and uniqueness of European cities and the preservation and exploitation of Europe’s cultural heritage and geographical diversity.

European regions and economic clusters are deeply rooted in older structures and development paths, are multi-layered
in many ways, which makes them less vulnerable for sudden changes in specific sectors. In contrast, in many very rapidly developing cities in Asia existing cultural heritages tend to be destroyed rather than preserved and the speed of urban development in the new Asia results in almost single-layered modernist cities, which may be highly vulnerable when

a new phase of economic restructuring arises. The cultural and more deeply rooted historical developments we find in European urban regions contribute
to the set of soft factors that seem to
be relevant for economic development. These factors include things like urban atmospheres, urban climates, attractive public and natural spaces and simply ‘places-to-be’. This conference addressed the geographic literature that argues that exactly these conditions should be met to enable the development of so-called creative or cultural industries.

Territorial identities

However, Europe is not a homogeneous set of countries and cities. It is a conglomerate of different ideas, traditions, institutions, and identities. Actually, it is not entirely clear what Europe is, and what the outer boundaries are. What we do know, and this was

also expressed during the conference,
is that cultural diversity is at the heart of the continent and this requires specific European approaches to geographical issues. Much of this cultural diversity is a legacy – the contemporary use of Europe’s rich and diverse past. This conference raised questions about whose legacy will be preserved. In that respect, the contribution of non-European immigrants to the European heritage is interesting and highly topical in debates about

multiculturalism, assimilation, and pluralism. Influences from elsewhere also shape European, regional and local territorial identities, which are grounded in the bonds between people and places, and thus shape the maps of and boundaries within Europe. This conference contributed to the exploration of continuity and change in the territorial identities of Europe and of the perceptions of it.

Vital and cohesive cities

As said, Europe has a rich urban cultural heritage. The city is not generally seen as something problematic. Instead, European cities are mainly still centres of vibrant social, economic, political and cultural life.

However, this is not to say European cities are without problems. In some cities the rapid influx of migrants from developing countries has created tensions on the housing and labour markets and caused questions about integration in society at large. New political and economic regimes sometimes resulted in increasing social inequality, which often is reflected in socio-spatial segregation, which tends to be perceived as blocking social integration as well. Together with urban sprawl, physical decay and social tensions, this trigged questions about how to sustain integrated and cohesive cities, how to reconstruct and regenerate urban districts, and so on.

This conference addressed problems with segregation, integration, affordability, homelessness, lack of cohesion, and also about how these issues could be tackled and strategically governed. Assumptions about increasing levels of segregation and inequality were critically evaluated, as were the presumed effects of socio-spatial inequality and ethnic segregation. A critical attitude in these spheres is an absolute requirement, since there seem to be firm discourses on segregation and segregation effects, which are gaining support among politicians across Europe, but which are hardly based upon detailed research investigations focused on socio-spatial behaviour.

A new vital rural Europe

Counter to the prevailing image
that pictures rural areas as declining, problematic, and left behind, this conference revealed that rural Europe should first of all be labelled as dynamic and not all of it is declining; changes
in activities and functions are affecting European land use and landscapes;
but this is giving rural Europe a new lease on life by generating new sources of livelihood. The conference taught us that both the nature and the intensity
of the transformation of Europe’s open space vary widely across the continent. There are problematic developments in some parts of Europe and attention is needed for specific social and age groups in rural areas; but new landscape identity was also recognised as unique selling points, and diversification, new nature, tourism and better accessibility as new strategies for sustainable development.

Nature as a friend

Nature is striking back when wounded. The character of economic development so far has ignored that fact that natural processes are threats when disturbed, and opportunities when recognizes for their true worth. Flooding on coasts and river valleys, overwhelmed drainage which floods property far away from a river following torrential downpours, and forest fires driven by drought and land mismanagement, all cost the economy dear. Even today development is taking place in many hazardous zones, and even more development is locating in future hazard zones where planning and predictive assessment are at odds. This is storing up big trouble for the future. Designing space and property with nature as a friend and not a possible enemy is a critical economic and social issue.

This conference contributed to a better knowledge of the interaction of natural, engineering, economical and human sciences, but also that planning information is vital in terms of assisting the planning and development processes as well as effectively reducing threats and losses.

The impact of climatic and non-climatic changes will result in changing hazard risk patterns over Europe. This conference has shown that there is a growing attention to European-wide risk assessment techniques and guidelines.

Input for research agendas: ways forward

1. There is a need for more recognition of the specific interrelation between Europe’s deeply rooted cultural diversity, heritage and specificity, and the social and economic development perspectives of urban regions.

2. There is a need for more comparative study into the sustainability of urban economic growth in European urban regions and in new booming urban regions in Asia and the USA.

3. There is a need for comparative research aimed at rigorous testing of the path dependence thesis as condition for urban economic development, while including old European cities as well as new Indian, Chinese and American cities.

4. Europe should pay more attention
to research in which so-called soft conditions for economic development, such as urban atmospheres, residential environments, cultural heritage, historical development paths take centre stage together with ‘classic’ theories; more integral approaches are required both in urban and rural contexts.

5. There should be more international comparative research in rural contexts in Europe to allow for a systematic comparison aimed at what conditions of rural areas best fit what kinds of sustainable development

6. There are serious doubts as to whether prevailing political and policy discourses are reflections of ‘reality’. Therefore, geographical research should critically address these discourses and contribute to its reformulation.

7. There is awareness that demographic and economic development are firmly related to environmental problems; yet the centre of gravity in research is on mapping, modelling and projecting natural hazards; there appears to be

a need for more research in which the social and physical geosciences are more strongly connected with each other.

8. There is a great need for Europe-wide tuning of risk assessment techniques for the major environmental threats. Also methodologies for handling risks, resulting in policy plans are to be developed. This reflects the “Chain

of Safety” viz. pro-action, prevention, preparation, response and follow-up.

9. European governance has resulted
in increasingly fuzzy administrative and political arrangements that very often lack transparency. An important background condition is the growing interdependency of different scales and the limitation of clear hierarchy. This state of affairs should be precisely mapped and assessed e.g. with respect to the quality of policymaking and implementation in different policy sectors.

10. The geopolitical qualities and disadvantages of a system of multilevel European governance that lacks essential state attributes at the supranational level should be studied. This refers to the way relations in the frontier zones of EU are managed as well as to the roles ‘Europe’ does play in the wider world.

11. We should avoid fuzzy concepts, such as territorial cohesion, balanced communities, and rich diversity.

12. All of these debates require attention in education

 

Compiled by: Henk Ottens. Last revision: August 4, 2012.

 

logoscritta

About (2)

About EUGEO

logoscrittaEUGEO is the Association of Geographical Societies in Europe. The aim of EUGEO is to represent its members at the European level and to coordinate and initiate joint activities of the members to advance research and education on the Geography of Europe and to promote the scientific discipline, the school subject and the professional practice of Geography in Europe. EUGEO has members from 27 countries. EUGEO also functions as a network and a forum for strengthening the position and operations of its member organisations, in particular for activities with a European dimension.

The history of EUGEO can be found under the History button on the main menu bar.

EUGEO Executive Committee
President:  Prof. Zoltán Kovács, Hungarian Geographical Society MFT
Secretary-General: Prof. Massimiliano Tabusi, Associazione dei Geografi Italiani (A.Ge.I) 
Members:
Prof. Antoine Le Blanc, Comité National Français de Géographie
Prof. Ana Pejdo, Croatian Geographical Society, Zadar
Prof. Kathy Reilly, The Geographical Society of Ireland
Prof. Christian Vandermotten, Royal Belgian Geographical Society SRBG
 
 

About Geographical Societies

Geographical Societies are, nationally or regionally organised, scholarly societies or associations of geographers and other practitioners of geography. Many societies were established during the 19th century by high-level persons from academia, business and politics in countries where international shipping and trading, overseas military operations and colonial exploitation formed an important aspect of their society and economy. Nearly all European Geographical Societies take responsibility for an important cultural heritage of maps, globes, books and expedition documents, drawings, photographs and artefacts.

The modern Geographical Society organises geographers, practitioners of geography and citizens, businesses, public agencies and ngo’s interested in geography with the aim to support and facilitate geographic research, education and application. Activities include publications, meetings, exhibitions, field excursions, media events, political lobbying, and international cooperation. National or regional (web)atlases and monographs are produced by many societies. Some societies or associations specialise in either scientific research or geography education and didactics, most national societies cover all activities of geographers and in geography.

The European Geographical Societies are, through their national IGU Committees, linked with the International Geographical Union.

About Geography

Geography provides people and society with scientific and professional knowledge and understanding about the earth and the world. Moreover, geography delivers tools and instruments to use this knowledge in practice. Central in geographical enquiry is the relation between people, society and their geospatial environment. From the daily local and regional environment in which we live, move and travel, via higher scale regional and national environments, up to the global environment: the earth and the world as the resource base for and the home of human being.

Good introductions into what geography is can be found on the websites of the Royal Geographical Society ( http://www.rgs.org/GeographyToday/What+is+Geography.htm ) and the International Geographical Union (http://www.igu-online.org/site/?page_id=657 ). Also, take a look at Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geography) or the Geography page of Wikipedia in your own language.

Geography is a broad subject that combines and integrates natural, social and technical bodies of knowledge. The core of Geography is the study of the nature, identity and diversity of locations, places and regions on or near the surface of the earth. Also, the interactions and movements over geospace are analysed, as are the relations between human phenomena (social space) and physical phenomena (natural and built space).

Geographers study the current situation and dynamics over time, both retrospective and prospective. The specialisations Regional Geography, Landscape Geography and Environmental Geography form a major backbone of the Geography discipline. In these domains, Physical Geography, studying processes and patterns in the natural environment, and Human Geography, studying the man-made social and built environment, meet. Theoretical frameworks based on the concepts of space, time and scale support these holistic approaches.

But geographers also want and need to understand, and develop conceptual, interpretive, explanatory and evaluative methodology and theory about geospatial behaviour, patterns, processes, relations, movements and dynamics, both of natural phenomena and human activities/phenomena. Moreover, critical assessments of the state of development of our environment are undertaken. These efforts have resulted in a whole range of thematic geographical specialisations and approaches. In many of these sub-disciplines geographers often incorporate knowledge and methods from adjacent or overlapping (sub-)disciplines and work together with scholars of these disciplines. In these specialisations the multi/interdisciplinary character of geography is most pronounced. Well established examples are: Geomorphology, Geohydrology, Biogeography, Urban Geography, Economic Geography, Cultural Geography and Political Geography. Examples of less common or very recent specialisations are: Military Geography, Marxist Geography, Geography of the Bible, Evolutionary Geography, Web Geography and Financial Geography. Especially within Economic and Transportation Geography, studying spatial efficiency or profitability are common research aims. 

The search for and promotion of sustainable relations between individuals, groups and society at large and their natural, built and social environments at different space/time scales is a main task of geography and geographers. Within Human Geography, the spatial aspects social justice is another normative object of study.

Geographical technologies (Technical Geography, GeoICT or Geomatics) have been developed over the centuries to support geographical inquiry and the dissemination and application of geographical knowledge. Cartography (maps, globes, digital mapping, etc.), spatial statistics and modelling, navigation systems (GPS), location based (web)services (LBS) and geographical information systems (GIS) are widely used examples, in science as well as in practice. They are jointly used in Human Geography and Physical Geography. (Geo)graphical computer and information network applications have developed particularly fast over the last decades, Also in this area, cooperation with adjacent fields like cartography, geodesy, surveying, remote sensing/earth observation and computer science is the rule. These technologies together form a sizable Geo-Information Science and Technology community and business sector.

In addition to the integrated spatial perspective, the interdisciplinary oriented thematic specialisations and the geospatial technologies, empirical researchfieldwork methodology and producing knowledge and tools for applications in practice are characteristics of much of the work geographers do. Planning, decision-making and management of urban and rural areas, regions, physical infrastructure, natural resources and environmental quality are fields where many geographers work. But also in public services, housing, real estate, transportation and logistics, travel and tourism, the media, international relations, international business and in international development geographers contribute.

Geography has a long tradition in education. It has, often starting in the 19th century, been one of the core subjects in general education in primary and secondary schools. Geographical knowledge and skills are considered essential for personal development, local and world orientation, supporting good citizenship and promoting sustainable development. Geographical education has evolved from topography and map reading into learning children to understand their own living environment as well as understanding the earth and the world as the resource base for and the home of human being for which a sustainable development course is needed. This spatial/geographical awareness and literacy is essential in personal and professional life. At upper level secondary education, more specialized geography courses are often an elective subject that prepares for academic bachelors programmes in geography and related disciplines and for professional education in fields like tourism, transportation and spatial and environmental planning and management. Many universities offer general geography programmes at bachelor, and specialised geography programmes at master and PhD level. Geographers also contribute to broad, multidisciplinary programmes like Liberal Arts, and Sciences, Regional/Area Studies, Urban Studies, Planning Studies, Environmental Studies and Development Studies.

About EUGEO activities

EUGEO acts as a network and forum for its member societies. The activities of EUGEO are complementary to those of the Geographical Societies and Associations in Europe and the International Geographical Union (IGU).

For EUGEO it is important to relate its activities to geographically relevant European institutions. In particular the European Union (EU), the Council of Europe (CoE) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) are of importance. Within the EU, alignment and cooperation with the Directorate-General for Regional Policy (DG Regio), the Directorate-General for the Environment (DG Environment), the Directorate General for Research and Innovation and the Directorate-General for Education and Culture is relevant. The ESPON programme (European Observation Network for Territorial Development and Cohesion) of DG Regio, the European Environmental Agency (EEA) of DG Environment and the Joint Research Centre of DG Research have participated in EUGEO congresses and EUGEO members are involved in their programmes.

Every year, EUGEO organises a symposium on the State of Geography and Geographical Societies in Europe, with the aim to exchange good practices and initiate or coordinate European activities of the members. Every other year EUGEO organises a congress on the Geography of Europe, with a focus on topical policy, research and education themes. Research on problems, challenges and prospects within the European Union and Europe at large is presented and discussed. Congresses have been held in Amsterdam (2007), Bratislava (2009), London (2011), Rome (2013). The next congress is in Budapest (2015).

EUGEO seminars and congresses are organised by EUGEO members. These activities are often combined with national events or events organised in Europe by the International Geographical Union IGU.

Advocacy for geography across Europe is a key activity of EUGEO. Recently, action has been undertaken to strengthen the position of geography teaching in Italy, Ireland and Malta through its network of member societies. EUGEO also contributed to EU policy development and geography curriculum redefinition in Australia.

For more information about EUGEO’s activities click the News and Events buttons on the main menu bar.

Author: Henk Ottens – Last revision: August 25, 2017 (MT)

 

 

About

About EUGEO

EUGEO is the Association of Geographical Societies in Europe. The aim of EUGEO is to represent its members at the European level and to coordinate and initiate joint activities of the members to advance research and education on the Geography of Europe and to promote the discipline Geography in Europe. EUGEO has members from 21 countries. EUGEO also functions as a network and a forum for strengthening the position and operations of its member organisations, in particular for activities with a European dimension.

The history of EUGEO can be found under the History button on the main menu bar.

EUGEO Executive Committee
President: Prof Henk Ottens, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG (First term 2010-2012/2013)
Secretary-General: Dr Massimiliano Tabusi, Italian Geographical Society SGI (First term 2012-2015)
Members:
Prof Zoltán Kovács, Hungarian Geographical Society MFT (First term 2012-2015)
Prof Christian Vandermotten, Royal Belgian Geographical Society SRBG (First term 2012-2015)

About Geographical Societies

Geographical Societies are, nationally or regionally organised, scholarly societies or associations of geographers and other practitioners of geography. Many societies were established during the 19th century by high level persons from academia, business and politics in countries where international shipping and trading, overseas military operations and colonial exploitation formed an important aspect of their society and economy. Nearly all European Geographical Societies take responsibility for an important cultural heritage of maps, globes, books and expedition documents, drawings, photographs and artefacts.

The modern Geographical Society organises geographers, practitioners of geography and citizens, businesses, public agencies and ngo’s interested in geography with the aim to support and facilitate geographic research, education and application. Activities include publications, meetings, exhibitions, field excursions, media events, political lobbying, and international cooperation. National or regional (web)atlases and monographs are produced by many societies. Some societies or associations specialise in either scientific research or geography education and didactics, most national societies cover all activities of geographers and in geography.

The European Geographical Societies are, through their national IGU Committees, linked with the International Geographical Union.

About Geography

Geography provides people and society with knowledge and understanding about the earth and the world. Moreover, geography delivers tools and instruments to use this knowledge in practice. Central in geographical enquiry is the relation between people, society and their spatial environment. From the daily environment in which we live and travel, via regional and national environments, up to the global environment, the earth and the world as the resource base for and the home of and  man.

Good introductions into what geography is can be found on the websites of the Royal Geographical Society ( http://www.rgs.org/GeographyToday/What+is+Geography.htm ) and the International Geographical Union ( http://www.igu-online.org/site/?page_id=657 ). Also, take a look at Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geography )

Geography is a broad subject that combines natural, social and technical bodies of knowledge. The core of Geography is the study of the nature, identity and diversity of locations, places and regions on or near the surface of the earth. Also, the interactions and movements over geospace are analysed, as are the relations between human phenomena (social space) and physical phenomena (built and natural space).

Geographers study the current situation and dynamics over time, both historic and prospective. Therefore, Regional Geography, Landscape Geography and Environmental Geography form a major backbone of the discipline. Here Physical Geography, studying processes and patterns in the natural environment, and Human Geography, studying the man-made social and built environment, meet. Theoretical frameworks based on the concepts of space, time and scale support these holistic approaches.

But geographers also want and need to understand, and develop interpretive and explanatory theory about geospatial behaviour, patterns, processes, relations, movements and dynamics, both of natural phenomena and human activities/phenomena. Moreover, critical assessments of the state of development of our environment are undertaken. This has resulted in a whole range of thematic geographical specialisations and approaches. In many of these sub-disciplines geographers often incorporate knowledge and methods from adjacent or overlapping (sub-)disciplines and work together with scholars of these disciplines. Here, the multi/interdisciplinary character of geography is most pronounced. For example, Geomorphology, Geohydrology, Biogeography, Urban Geography, Economic Geography, Cultural Geography and Political Geography are well-established specialisations. But also less usual or very recent specialisations like Military Geography, Marxist Geography, Geography of the Bible, Evolutionary Geography, Web Geography and Financial Geography exist.

The search for and promotion of sustainable relations between individuals, groups and society at large and their natural, built and social environments at different space/time scales is a main task of geography and geographers.

Geographical technologies (technical geography or geomatics) have been developed over the centuries to support geographical inquiry and the dissemination and application of geographical knowledge. Cartography (maps, globes, digital mapping), spatial statistics and modelling, navigation systems (GPS), location based (web)services (LBS) and geographical information systems (GIS) are widely used examples, in science and in practice. They are jointly used in Human Geography and Physical Geography. (Geo)graphical computer applications have developed particularly fast over the last decades, Also in this area cooperation with adjacent fields like cartography, geodesy, surveying, remote sensing/earth observation and computer science is the rule, together forming a sizable Geo-Information Science and Technology community and business sector.

Next to the integrated spatial perspective, the interdisciplinary oriented thematic specialisations and the geospatial technologies, empirical researchfieldwork methodology and producing knowledge and tools for applications in practice are characteristics of much of the work geographers do. Planning, decision-making and management of urban and rural areas, regions, physical infrastructure, natural resources and environmental quality are fields where many geographers work. But also in housing, real estate, transportation and logistics, travel and tourism, the media, international relations, international business and in international development geographers contribute.

Geography has a long tradition in education. It has, often starting in the 19th century, been one of the core subjects in general education in primary and secondary schools. Geographical knowledge and skills are considered essential for personal development, local and world orientation and supporting good citizenship. Geographical education has evolved from topography and map reading into learning children to understand their own living environment as well as understanding the earth and the world as the home of man for which a sustainable development course is needed. This spatial/geographical awareness is essentail in personal and professional life. At upper level secondary education, more specialized geography courses are often an elective subject that prepares for academic bachelors programmes in geography and related disciplines and for professional bachelors in fields like tourism, transportation and spatial and environmental planning and management. Many universities offer general geography programmes at bachelor, and specialised geography programmes at master and PhD level. Geographers also contribute to broad, multidisciplinary programmes like liberal arts, area studies, urban studies, planning studies, environmental studies and development studies.

About EUGEO activities

EUGEO acts as a network and forum for its member societies. The activities of EUGEO are complementary to those of the Geographical Societies and Associations in Europe and the International Geographical Union (IGU).

For EUGEO it is important to relate its activities to geographically relevant European institutions. In particular the European Union (EU), the Council of Europe (CoE) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) are of importance. Within the EU, alignment and cooperation with the Directorate-General for Regional Policy (DG Regio), the Directorate-General for the Environment (DG Environment), the Directorate General for Research and Innovation and the Directorate-General for Education and Culture is relevant. The ESPON programme (European Observation Network for Territorial Development and Cohesion) of DG Regio, the European Environmental Agency (EEA) of DG Environment and the Joint Research Centre of DG Research have participated in EUGEO congresses and EUGEO members are involved in their programmes.

Every year, EUGEO organises a symposium on the State of Geography in Europe, with the aim to exchange good practices and initiate or coordinate European activities of the members. Every other year EUGEO organises a congresson the Geography of Europe, with a focus on topical policy themes. Research on problems, challenges and prospects within the European Union and Europe at large is presented and discussed. Congresses have been held in Amsterdam (2007), Bratislava (2009) and London (2011). The next congress is in Rome (2013).

EUGEO seminars and congresses are organised by EUGEO members. These activities are often combined with national events or events organised in Europe by the International Geographical Union IGU.

Advocacy for geography across Europe is a key activity of EUGEO. Recently, action has been undertaken to strengthen the position of geography teaching in Italy, Ireland and Malta through its network of member societies. EUGEO also contributed to EU policy development and geography curriculum redefinition in Australia.

For more information about EUGEO’s activities click the Activities and Congresses buttons on the main menu bar.

Author: Henk Ottens – Last revision: November 18, 2012 (MT)

Contact

 

For enquiries about joining EUGEO, or to receive further information, please contact: info[at]eugeo.eu

EUGEO history

EUGEO history

roma villa celimontana
Villa Celimontana, Rome, Italy

EUGEO is formed at the initiative of the Italian Geographical Society (Società Geographica Italiana, SGI). In 1994 representatives of geographical societies in the European Union gathered in Rome in the headquarters of SGI, Villa Celimontana (the ‘home of Geography’), and decided to establish an association. The idea was to encourage and enhance greater collaboration between the independent scholarly European geographical societies, associations and institutes, each of whom had a community of geographers from a nation or region in a EU member state as their membership.

The initial objectives of EUGEO were to improve communication and exchange ideas between member institutions, to act as a lobbying body for geography in Europe, to improve synchronisation of geographical research at a Pan-European level, and to identify new scientific and educational responsibilities for geography within Europe so as to position geography more fully within the centre of the European debate.

Between 1994 and 1996 the statutes were drafted and agreed and in Paris in December 1996 the first meeting of the Board of Directors and the first General Assembly took place, with representatives from each of the founding societies.

EUGEO functions since 1997 as an international scientific association under Belgian law. Cooperation among the different national and regional geographical societies and associations in the EU, participation in joint projects to study European problems, promotion of geography at the European level and establishing relations with the European Union became the main priority aims.

The activity level of EUGEO got a boost when preparations started for a congress to be organised by the Royal Dutch Geographical Siciety (KNAG) in Amsterdam in 2007. At that time, the aims and objectives of EUGEO were redifined as:

  • to raise and stimulate awareness of geography and environmental matters in schools, higher education, business, governments and the public at large in Europe;
  • to provide a focus for European wide research in all fields of geography in Europe;
  • to tackle geographical issues from a comprehensive European Union perspective;
  • to prepare and bring to the attention of the competent institutions and authorities, in particular of the European Union, recommendations that will further the aims of the Society;
  • to promote the professional standing and development of geography in Europe;
  • to facilitate information exchange through initiating publications and convening conferences and similar meetings;
  • to promote a European wide geographical information resource; to promote good practice in the teaching of geography at all levels in European education.
 

The first president of EUGEO was Henri Nicolaï of the Royal Belgian Geographical Society (Société Royale Belge de Géographie), first Secretary-General Armando Montanari of the Italian Geographical Society. Henri Nicolaï was followed up by Christian Vandermotten, also of the Belgian Geographical Society, Armando Montanari by Rita Gardner of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). In December 2009, Henk Ottens of the Royal Dutch Geographical Society was elected president.

The early history of EUGEO is documented in an article by Armando Montanari and Henri Nicolai as part of the Special Issue of Belgeo produced for the 30th International Geographical Congress in Glasgow in 2004 (Geography in Europe; free download at this link).

Author: Henk Ottens. Last revision: August 2, 2012 (BELGEO link added thanks to Christian Vandermotten, Massimiliano Tabusi, Jan 7, 2014).

The EUGEO statutes (memorandum) (english version)

plaguevillacelimontana

Plague at Villa Celimontana